Patience vs. Inactivity

A few weeks ago, I wrote About Impatience and Development. After publishing that post, it occurred to me that not only impatience but also patience can get in a person’s way. Both have their origin in a kind of egoism, although the cause of that egoism goes in two different directions. Impatience can mean stress not to miss an opportunity. The more important something is, the more it pushes you. Does anyone remember the run on toilet paper two years ago? Wow, how selfish was that? I need it, I have to have it, I have a right to it, me, me, me… Impatience can cloud our view of reason and make us run blindly toward blinking lights. In this blindness, we can quickly lose our orientation. In contrast, patience has the calmness to wait in the background until the opportunity presents itself to seize it.

We have to be honest about what we want
and take risks rather than lie to ourselves
and make excuses to stay in our comfort zone.
~ Roy T. Bennett

But just as impatience can have a good side, keeping us moving, looking for opportunities, and desiring to explore and evolve, patience can lead to a dead end. It’s easy to disguise the discomfort of change and taking a risk with the life you’re used to (even if you don’t like it) as patience. Because then you don’t have to leave your comfort zone, and whatever happens makes you a victim of circumstances. That is when opportunities pass by, and dreams do not come true because their development got left to the circumstances that others create.

When it comes to patience, we don’t have to change old habits; we can build better ones.
~ Sue Bender

This abusive interpretation seems to prevent these people from taking responsibility for their lives. But they may overlook the fact that it was their inaction that robbed them of the chance of living a life they dreamed of. Inaction is as much a choice as the responsibility of the inactive person. They cannot blame circumstances or people for it. They have not been in a state of watchful patience but in inactivity that has kept them from breaking out of their lives, developing, and exploring it. It was their inactivity that made them waste the moment while the opportunity was standing in front of them, ready to light up their lives.

The two hardest tests on the spiritual road are the patience to wait for the right moment and the courage not to be disappointed with what we encounter.
~ Paulo Coelho

Patience is enormous power in itself which centers and grounds a person. But grounding must not be confused with sluggishness. Patience is a creative force in motion that also requires action. It does not lose sight of the goal while lying in wait. It has a plan, brings about change, creates circumstances, and has the tranquility to watch conditions develop and order themselves. Patience will then take a clear and unwavering step at the right time, with no excuses standing in its way.

Don’t sit and wait until things solve themselves.
At times it may work in the small but rarely in the big.
The Law of Attraction only works as much as you cooperate.
It opens doors, but YOU have to walk through them. 
Don’t wait until you get asked to take action. 
People won’t ask you at all, or they get tired of pushing you to your luck,
solving your problems, and preparing everything for your convenience.

In Love and Light

About the Author

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The purpose of my blog is to inspire and shine a light on the beauty and power of the wonderful being inside your body. You came into this world to share what only you can give. Remember who you really are, conquer the world the way you always wanted to, and become the blessing to us all that you were meant to be.

19 Comments

Well said dear lady, that balance thing in the middle or is it each time we are burnt from acting or inaction ever guiding us inward. One of the most powerful things I have found is listening. But of what use is it if not acted upon or at least shared. And for that matter it really isn’t an inaction, unless we don’t act on it, blocking its intent. Mmm, intent…in either case…maybe that is the key. Great share 😀 ❤️ 🙏🏽 🦋

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Patience is good but like every emotion and characteristic, it has a two fold energy. It can be beneficial or detrimental towards findings solutions, making decisions, etc..

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It has its distorting counterpart. Some are hiding behind patience to let things happen and developed… although it is inactivity since they only need an excuse not to take action.

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Yes, you totally nailed the difference. Patience is a completely active attitude of awareness. Inactivity rather happens in our comfort zones.

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Erika, great post and advice. To me patience also allows you to figure out what happened and take necessary and impactful steps, not rash ones. Rash reaction is often the worst thing to do. When arguing with someone who likes to sling mud, the best tactic is not to get into a mudfight. Take your time and study the problem, then act. Keith

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That is such a good example here. I totally second what you said here. Lately, I was attacked by one of my sisters with hidden/obvious provocative comments in a WhatsApp group. My other sister got attacked too. I felt like ‘No, I don’t play your pseudo-psychological games.’, and not replied at all (although it annoyed me). I knew this would only make things worse for me. My others sister could not help it and replied, which kept the discussion going. So, yes, again, I second your words, Keith!

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